Anthony Bryan is Living His Best Life

Anthony Bryan and I are sitting across from each other in Sir James Dunn Hall. The Black Box Theatre is right above us.

I ask him about the first time he performed stand-up comedy. The question takes Bryan back home to Trinidad and Tobago. His first try at stand up comedy happened at a school talent show.

“I forgot all my jokes,” Bryan says. “I cried. It was bad. I didn’t stop going up on stage, but I did stop doing stand up for awhile.”

Thankfully, Bryan’s journey to becoming a stand-up comic didn’t start and end there. His second try at stand-up would happen years later and far away from any stage in Trinidad.

We fast forward to the fall of 2016, Bryan is in his final year at St. Thomas University.

Comedian Sabrina Jalees has just finished an event for Welcome Week. At the end of it, she asks if anyone in the crowd is interested in doing comedy. Bryan shoots his hand up, no hesitation. Jalees asks Bryan if he would like five minutes before her show later. “Everyone turned and looked at me.” Bryan was not expecting that.

In his mind, Bryan thought Jalees was going to give a workshop or put him in contact with someone.

“I couldn’t say no. I had to say yes. Otherwise, it wouldn’t make for a very interesting story,” Bryan says. “I’m glad I said yes. I had a hell of a time. It was a lot of fun.”

For Bryan, moving to Canada was “intense” and “a big departure” from everything he knew.

“When I moved to Fredericton, I knew nothing about it,” Bryan says. “I didn’t know the population size. I didn’t know what the school looked like. I didn’t what the winters were like. I knew nothing about New Brunswick.”

“I was at a point in my life where I wanted to get out, so I just sort of did it. I went in blind. Everything surprised me.”

These days, Bryan takes more time looking into the things he wants to do and how best to pursue them. Still, there is a part of him that enjoys taking risks.

“Honestly, I don’t usually share my material with people. It’s very uncommon,” Bryan says. “I kind of go for broke. I trust myself to take that risk sometimes. It’s a lot of fun that way. Nothing beats writing a joke and wondering if people are going to laugh.”

Bryan tells me that in his stand-up, one of the things he likes to talk about is his identity as a black person. “I like throwing race things in there. It’s different for Fredericton. It’s also an interesting identity to go into and really explore. How do I view myself as a black person? How do I view myself as a member of the black community?”

We share our experiences as people of colour. I tell him about growing up as a visible minority in Fredericton, and how effective humour can be for fitting in. Major air quotes on that last part.

“If I know anything about doing comedy, nowhere is as progressive as they think they are, “ Bryan says. “People aren’t as progressive as they think they are. I can also be unaware and disrespectful, but one of the cool things about comedy is you can bring that to people’s attention.

“Obviously, it doesn’t work all the time. I did a show once, and I was talking about how excited white people get to say the N-word. This girl comes up to me after my set and says ‘you’re right, white people should say nigger more’. I was like, that’s not at all what my set was about. But I know somebody, there’s got to be one person there who saw it and was like yeah, maybe I should stop saying that.”

I met Bryan last month at the Wilser’s Room. The venue is home to a monthly open mic night that Bryan has been organizing since January. We spoke after the last of eleven comedians performed their set.

“That one was a bit of a stacked show,” Bryan says. “I probably will never do a show with eleven comedians again. That was a learning experience for me.”

Our conversation turns to something Bryan mentioned at the open mic. In 2017, Bryan came close to being deported. The bureaucratic nightmare began with Bryan’s new study permit.

“I would be on the phone for hours waiting for this thing,” Bryan says. “They didn’t know what was happening. I was not a person in Canada. It’s scary to almost not be able to come back, especially when I laid out all these plans.”

I ask Bryan about the future.

“I want to do cool stuff with the room,” Bryan says. “I want to see how much you can do with stand-up comedy. I love big cabaret shows, bringing that to the show would be a ton of fun.”

When Bryan is not performing stand-up, he is busy writing scripts. His first play I Love This City premiered last year at Theatre St. Thomas’ festival of new plays, What’s Next? He hopes to continue writing. He has a script for a short film that he would like to see picked up by the local film community.

I tell Bryan that it sounds like he’s living his best life.

“I am. It took me awhile to get here,” Bryan says. “I’ve wanted to live like this for a long time. It’s fun to finally be here.”


Open Mic Comedy at the Wilser’s Room runs the first Thursday of every month. The next event is scheduled for April 4th. The show starts at 7:30pm. No cover, but donations are welcome.

JUNO Nominee Alison Young on So Here We Are and Learning to Let Go of Perfection

 

Alison Young, saxophonist.

Alison Young’s So Here We Are is up for Jazz Album of the Year: Solo at the 2019 JUNO Awards. Photo Credit: Lisa MacIntosh Photography.

In January, saxophonist Alison Young earned a JUNO nomination for her debut album So Here We Are. The album is up for Jazz Album of the Year: Solo at the 2019 JUNO Awards. The Toronto-based jazz artist remembers feeling shocked when the news broke.

“Initially I thought, that’s got to be a mistake,” Young said. “It’s my first album, and that it got nominated is a big deal for me. The recognition is so meaningful to me. It feels really important to be acknowledged like that.”

“You never know if you are going in the right direction or if people like what you are doing. You feel heard.”

The Ottawa native has been active in Toronto’s jazz scene since the early 2000s. She studied music at the University of Toronto, and since then has toured across North America, Europe, and South America.

Young describes So Here We Are as a “musical hello” and an amalgamation of all the music she likes to play.

“I’ve been wanting to put out an album for years,” Young said. “I’ve been trying to talk myself into it for five or six years. It’s easy to get distracted from my own projects.”

Movement on the album began when recording engineer Jeremy Darby of Canterbury Music Company offered Young studio time.

“The way it happened was Jeremy Darby gives away a day of free recording time to people he thinks deserves it, “ Young said. “It was a real push, him awarding that to me. That really forced me to get the band together and actually lay it down.”

“I felt like I wasn’t ready. I felt stressed out. It was hard to make decisions about how the songs should be presented,” Young said about recording the album. “By the time we did the second session, it was a lot more fun and cool and not as stressful.”

Young recorded the album with her band the Alison Young Quintet. The band has played together since 2012. “We are all friends and have played together in various bands and also as a band. It’s a good hang. It’s good musical chemistry there.”

Young has learned many things over the years as a jazz artist, but perhaps the most important lesson she has learned is to let go of perfection.

“I actually quit playing after going to university, because I over thought everything so much. I thought I needed to make music more complicated than it needed to be.”

“You just have to start. You’re always going to learn as you go. Let go of the idea of ever attaining any kind of perfection,” Young said. “The more you know, the more you don’t know. Be okay with it always having to be a learning process. That’s the thing about music, it’s really beautiful and daunting, but you never get there.”

What’s next for Young after the JUNO Awards? In June, Young is going on the road with Corey Hart, the latest inductee into the Canadian Music Hall of Fame. After the tour, Young says she hopes to play music festivals with her band.


The 2019 JUNO Awards will be live from Budweiser Gardens in London, ON on Sunday, March 17 at 8 PM ET and broadcast live on CBC, CBC Radio One, CBC Music, the free CBC Gem streaming service, and globally at cbcmusic.ca/junos.

Learn more about Alison Young at alisonyoungmusic.com

Follow Alison on Facebook and Instagram.

 

Extra, Extra! Newsies Rocks The Black Box Theatre

Did you know the Broadway musical Newsies is an adaptation of a 1992 musical film produced by Disney? I didn’t. I guess I was too busy watching Power Rangers in the 90s. I wish someone had told me about Newsies a lot sooner, because folks, it is seriously awesome.

Based on the Newsboys Strike of 1899 in New York City, Newsies (Lyrics by Jack Feldman, Music by Alan Merken, Book by Harvey Fierstein) tells an underdog story about children taking a stand against The Man, otherwise known as publishing magnate Joseph Pulitzer (Drake Ferris). The newly unionized children refuse to work until Pulitzer reverses his decision to raise the cost of newspapers for newsies. The organized strike is led by Jack Kelly (Cameron Patterson), a charismatic orphan who dreams of leaving the Big Apple for Santa Fe. With help from reporter Katherine Plumber (Allie Jeffery), the newsies’ cause is made known across the city.

Under the direction of Tania Breen, STU Musical Theatre’s production of Newsies is a real winner.

First, let’s talk about the cast. Here are more than 30 students absolutely crushing it, number after number. The characters come to life with earnest theatricality. You could freeze almost any scene with the newsies and capture in that one image so many little stories. These moments really pop thanks to the clarity Breen brings as a director.   

Patterson’s Jack has a sharp tongue and plenty of swagger. Of course, none of that makes a difference for Jeffery’s Katherine who can’t be impressed so easily. Jeffery is a true delight in the role of Katherine. Ferris is entertainingly pompous as the newspaper tycoon. Mallory Kelly shows great comedic timing as the plucky youngster Les. 

Courtney Arsenault’s choreography is big and explosive, which is absolutely wild because the Black Box Theatre isn’t that large, especially when you fill it with an audience. I just imagine someone saying the same thing to Arsenault and her replying with “watch me.” What makes the choreography so good is how Arsenault captures that fighting spirit and youthful energy that Newsies is all about. Arsenault’s choreography is absolutely electric.

Newsies tells a story that’s still relevant in our modern times. More than a century later, young people and their concerns are still being marginalized. “Think for yourself!” but not like that. “Stand for what you believe in!” but not like that. How dare young people protest greed while the Earth is slowly dying, right? Newsies reminds us that young people can make a difference, that Goliath can be defeated.

The production is held back by poor sound mixing. The orchestra, led by Michael Doherty, overpowers the ensemble’s vocals. So, the anthemic “Seize The Day” loses some of its lyrical power. There are also pieces of dialogue lost along the way. Frustrating? You betcha.

Ross Simonds’ vocal direction manages to shine despite the audio troubles.

From the timeless story to the irresistible musical score, there’s a lot to like about Newsies. Don’t miss STU Musical Theatre’s outstanding production. It’s a must-see.


STU Musical Theatre’s production of Newsies runs Feb 20 – 23 (7:30pm) at the Black Box Theatre, located on the St. Thomas University campus. There is a 2:00pm matinee on Saturday, February 23rd. Tickets are $20 General / $15 Students.

Meet Laura-Beth Bird, Founder and Producer of Grey Rabbit Theatre Co.

In 2018, Laura-Beth Bird left her job at a local restaurant to pursue her dream of starting a theatre company. The 24-year-old theatre artist had a plan and the savings to start her first show. Then, reality hit.

“I ended up having to use that money to live for two months, which kinda threw a wrench in the whole system,” Bird said. “So, I had to go back to the drawing board.”

Born in Shropshire, England, Bird’s family moved to Canada when she was 10 years old. Her family settled first in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, then later Saint John, New Brunswick. Bird relocated to Fredericton to study at St. Thomas University, where she graduated from in 2017.

When her plans went awry, Bird began to wonder if her theatre company would become something that only happened on weekends.

“I was miserable in the job I was in. Anyone who saw me knew it,” Bird said. “I was panicking thinking that I would have to go back to that. I was going to be forty…doing my art on the weekends because that’s maybe when I could get the days off. I didn’t want that life.”

The “kick in the butt” motivated Bird to apply for Planet Hatch’s ARTtrepenur-in-Residence program. Bird was accepted into the program and started her three-month residency in June. The residency ended with an evening of new play readings. It was the first public event hosted by Fredericton’s newest theatre company, Grey Rabbit Theatre Co.

“Planet Hatch helped me network with larger business communities in the region,” Bird said. “That in turn helped me with strategic funding and planning for five, ten years down the road.”

In the fall, Bird participated in ArtsLink NB’s CATAPULT Arts Accelerator.

Bird has also received support from Fredericton’s theatre community.

“Everyone has been helpful about knowledge and experience,” Bird said. “If they know people, they will put me in contact with them. If we continue to create that sort of practice, it makes people more successful in the region.”

Bird realizes trying to launch a theatre career in Atlantic Canada is somewhat unorthodox.

“Many of the people my age are leaving to Toronto or New York because they feel like they have no opportunities left in Atlantic Canada to be artists,” Bird said. “In the last year, I have been researching ways to make this work. I don’t want to move right now to a big city where I will be a small fish in a big pond. I would rather be a medium fish in a medium pond.”

“That means I take scripts being created here — by emerging and professional artists — and help them reach either stages by myself producing them or matching them with other producers in the area.  If it doesn’t work for mine, it may work for Eastern Front or Neptune Theatre.”

Does Bird agree that Grey Rabbit could be considered both an incubator and a presenter?

“Kind of, yeah,” Bird said. “At this moment, I feel like as I’m learning these things, I am also sharing it with my artistic community, because I want my artistic community to thrive as well.”

In December, Grey Rabbit, in partnership with Theatre St. Thomas, held a workshop for artists seeking to professionalize their artistic practice.

Have all the developments of the past year changed how Bird views herself as an artist?

“I don’t really notice a difference. My friend does. She told me I look healthier and happier, which is hilarious for me. I’m not doing anything different,” Bird said. “I think I am more confident and much more ambitious than I was. I am not willing to let things go. I have to chase after it. If I don’t chase after it, it’s not going to happen. I am more tenacious and cognizant of the way the world views me, because what I’m creating is an extension of myself.”

Bird’s idea of what it means to live as an artist has changed since starting on this path with Grey Rabbit. 

“I’m going to go work on my art which is my business,” Bird said. “ If I have a consistent income, I have more freedom to practice my art. Having a stable business gives me freedom to create. I don’t have to worry about if my power is going to be shut off.”

So far, Bird sees her time being divided 60/40 between the business operations of Grey Rabbit and its artistic end. “I spend a lot more time filling out grant applications and writing than I do creating. It’s just the season that I’m in.”

This year, Grey Rabbit is launching The Vardi Puppet House. The children’s puppet theatre will tour Atlantic Canada in the summer.

A Vardi is a gypsy caravan that is pulled by horses. They were things I came across as a child, and I’ve always loved them,” Bird said. “The puppet house is designed to look like a gypsy caravan. It will be bright red, with wagon wheels. There will be windows that open on the side for the performance. It will have that classic painting technique used on most caravans, and I will use Punch and Judy stylized puppets.”

Bird describes the puppet house as a platform that “lends itself well to public events” and is ideal for helping grow a viewership base. 

Grey Rabbit is currently accepting new scripts for The Vardi Puppet House. The submission deadline is February 28th, 2019.  

 

Joyful Magpies’ Best of Fredericton Theatre 2018

Arrivals and Departures

In February, Theatre New Brunswick announced the departure of Artistic Director Thomas Morgan Jones. Natasha MacLellan was named TNB’s new artistic director in July. MacLellan is the former Artistic Producer of Ship’s Company Theatre.

Next Folding Theatre Company staged its final production in March, bringing an end to the company after eight years.

Grey Rabbit Theatre Co. is Fredericton’s newest theatre company. Theatre artist Laura-Beth Bird is the company’s founder and producer. Grey Rabbit held its first public event in August. The public was invited to an evening of play readings at Planet Hatch, where Bird was the ARTrepreneur-in-Residence.

Stay tuned for Joyful Magpies’ interview with Laura-Beth Bird.

Drumroll

Well, here we are. The end of 2018. Creating this list wasn’t easy. It was, however, really fun to write. What a blast to look back on the past year, and remember everyone who shared their talents with audiences in Fredericton.

See you in the new year!

Note: My review of Theatre St. Thomas’ A Life of Galileo is available here.



JOYFUL MAGPIES’ BEST OF FREDERICTON THEATRE 2018

Best Actor

Hannah Blizzard – No Exit – Theatre UNB

Honorable Mentions:
Claudia Gutierrez-Perez – Any Given Moment – Theatre New Brunswick
Kira Chisholm – The Dangers of Geothermal Heating – NotaBle Acts Theatre Festival

Best Supporting Actor

Allison Basha – The Lion, The Witch, and The Wardrobe – Theatre New Brunswick

Honorable Mentions:
Jane Marney – The Real Inspector Hound – Theatre UNB
Sage Chisholm – A Life of Galileo – Theatre St. Thomas

Best Ensemble

The Dangers of Geothermal Heating – NotaBle Acts Theatre Festival

Honorable Mentions:
A Life of Galileo – Theatre St. Thomas
No Exit – Theatre UNB

Best Set Design

Andy Moro – Finding Wolastoq Voice – Theatre New Brunswick

Honorable Mentions:
Mike Johnston – The Dangers of Geothermal Heating – NotaBle Acts Theatre Festival

Robin Whittaker & Chris Saad – A Life of Galileo – Theatre St. Thomas

Best Lighting Design

Ingrid Risk – Any Given Moment – Theatre New Brunswick

Honorable Mentions:
Chris Saad – The Dangers of Geothermal Heating – NotaBle Acts Theatre Festival
Trent Logan  – A Record of Us – Solo Chicken Productions

Best Sound Design

Deanna H. Choi – The Lion, The Witch, and the Wardrobe – Theatre New Brunswick

Honorable Mentions:
Mike Johnston – The Dangers of Geothermal Heating – NotaBle Acts Theatre Festival
Aaron Collier – Any Given Moment – Theatre New Brunswick

Best Costume Design

Cathleen McCormack – Any Given Moment – Theatre New Brunswick

Honorable Mentions:
Kat Hall – Songs of the Seer – The Next Folding Theatre Company
Laura-Beth Bird – The Dangers of Geothermal Heating – NotaBle Acts Theatre Festival

Best Direction

Lisa Anne Ross – The Dangers of Geothermal Heating – Notable Acts Theatre Festival

Honorable Mentions:
Jean-Michel Cliche – Casualties – NotaBle Acts Theatre Festival
Len Falkenstein – No Exit – Theatre UNB

Step Through the Wardrobe with Theatre New Brunswick

Published in 1950, C.S. Lewis’ The Lion, The Witch, and The Wardrobe is an enduring tale of family and forgiveness. The book was adapted for the screen in 2005, with Liam Neeson as Aslan and Tilda Swinton as Jadis the White Witch. This holiday season, Theatre New Brunswick brings the story to life in a production that’s fun for the whole family, save for some intense moments.

Dramatized by Joseph Robinette, The Lion, The Witch, and The Wardrobe tells the story of four siblings who discover the magical world of Narnia after walking through a wardrobe. The first to find Narnia, Lucy (Sasha Mais) meets a fawn named Tumnus (Andy Massingham) who has been ordered by the Witch (Raven Dauda) to kidnap human children. Tumnus refuses to take Lucy to the Witch and helps her escape Narnia. Because he allowed Lucy to go free, Tumnus is taken away by the captain of the Witch’s secret police Fenris Ulf (Qasim Khan).

Lucy returns to Narnia with her brother Edmund (Ben Rutter). Edmund stays put while Lucy goes out to find Tumnus. Edmund meets the Witch who promises him royalty and rooms full of turkish delight if he brings the other three to her castle. The Witch’s plan: To keep the prophecy that promises an end to her reign over Narnia from coming true.

Older siblings Peter (Carter Scott) and Susan (Elena Hrkalovic) join the others in Narnia. With help from Mr. and Mrs. Beaver (Derek Kwan, Allison Basha), the four children embark on an epic journey to help Aslan (Jeremiah Sparks) return peace to Narnia.

Patrick Clark’s set is really neat. The back wall features a large oval frame and within that frame, there are mountain peaks layered behind each other. In the centre of the frame stands a big, tall castle. It kinda has the look of a pop-up book. Outside of the frame, there are trees that resemble a paper craft, a lamppost, and multi-purpose blocks (stone table, Beavers’ dinner table).

Leigh Ann Vardy lights the inside of the frame with frigid blues, and warmer colours when the Witch’s control over Narnia starts to diminish. The lighting work gives Clark’s set a little bit of a Magic Garden vibe. Vardy’s eerie lighting for the scene where Edmund finds the Witch’s enemies, now turned to stone, is stunning.

Sound Designer/Composer Deanna H. Choi makes the production feel like a sweeping epic, despite being staged in quite a minimalist way. Choi’s sound design opens up the world of Narnia with strings and drums.

Robinette’s stage adaptation keeps some of the more harsh elements of Lewis’ story (Aslan tells Peter to wipe Fenris Ulf’s blood off his sword). These parts of the play clash with Lynda Hill’s brisk and upbeat direction, and the colorful pop of the production.

But Father Christmas makes an appearance, so it’s not all grim!

Speaking of not grim, Dauda is comically evil as the Witch. Sure, she has her dark moments, like plunging a knife into Aslan (it’s shadow theatre, don’t worry), but Dauda’s Witch is like something out of a Saturday morning cartoon. The actress is delightfully physical in the role, giving little kicks when things aren’t going the Witch’s way. There is a levity that Hill allows the production to explore and Dauda runs with it.

Kwan and Basha are a great pairing as Mr. and Mrs. Beaver. Clark has dressed the Beavers with big tails, which are attached to overalls. No comically-sized teeth, thank goodness. For the bottom layer, the Beavers wear long-sleeve flannel shirts. If it weren’t for the tails, one might think the couple worked deep in the woods.

Back to Kwan and Basha.

Kwan and Basha are superbly pleasant as the Beavers. Basha’s Mrs. Beaver is a sweetheart, while Kwan’s Mr. Beaver has a little bit of a gruff edge but you know he’s a softie at heart. The actors are a lot of fun to watch.

Who’s afraid of Fenris Ulf? Not me, because Khan’s howls sound more like an angry house cat than a big bad wolf. Which is hilarious. It works well with the ‘cartoonish supervillainy’ of this production.

Massingham is jovial as Tumnus, brutish as the Dwarf, and jolly as Father Christmas.

The Lion, The Witch, and the Wardrobe asks us to reflect on what family really means. Family means to love each other despite our faults and to forgive when we are wronged. It’s a strong message for this time of year when families are coming together, sometimes from far away, for the holiday season. 

It’s also a hopeful story about good always winning over tyranny, no matter the odds.

The big brother/little brother dynamic is well-performed by Scott and Rutter. I say this as someone with two older brothers. Mais’ Lucy is daring and kind — a small, yet mighty force. Hrkalovic’s Susan is a joy. The four actors make clear the play’s message about family with strong performances and a confidence that pulls the production forward.

And what’s Narnia withouts Aslan? Sparks is fiercely majestic as the good lion. He is a big presence with a big voice that fills the theatre.

TNB’s production of The Lion, The Witch, and The Wardrobe is fun, exciting, and heartwarming. Step through the wardrobe, a good time awaits you.


Theatre New Brunswick’s The Lion, The Witch, and the Wardrobe ran Dec 13 – 15 at the Fredericton Playhouse. The production is now on tour with performances this week in Moncton. 

For more information, visit: http://www.tnb.nb.ca/lion-witch-wardrobe/

Magic Show Returning to Sussex After Festival Win

Sawyer Stanley knows a thing or two about turning the ordinary into the extraordinary.

“My mom used to leave chore lists out on the table,” said the 19-year-old magician from Sussex, New Brunswick. “The magic tricks were kind of way to get those chores done faster. They started out like life hacks almost, and then turned into magic.”

In those early days, Stanley was learning magic from YouTube videos. Among the magicians Stanley was watching on YouTube were Criss Angel, David Blaine, and Shin Lim (who won this year’s America’s Got Talent). Eventually, the young magician moved away from YouTube to books.

“You get so much from one book,” Stanley said about the transition. “Plus, it’s not as common. People aren’t learning tricks from books anymore. You’re learning things that aren’t out there.”

Stanley booked his first public performance last December at a local restaurant. He performed tableside magic for guests. “It went great. I went back a couple times to do it.”

At the start of 2018, Stanley’s mentor Tabraze Sheikh (of The Modern Mind Readers) encouraged him to apply for the Fundy Fringe Festival in Saint John.

“He said you should put your show in. I ended up being the fourth name drawn for the regional acts, so that was awesome”

That show was (Extra)Ordinary Day.

With help from his mentor, Stanley developed (Extra)Ordinary Day after reconsidering his approach to magic performance.

“I had to find a niche, that was the first thing,” said Stanley. “I was doing shows, but it was tricks thrown together.”

Stanley asked himself: “If I had magic powers for real, what would those powers entail?”

The answer? Practical magic.

“You’re never going to see something in the show and go, why did he do that?” Stanley said. “There’s no, why did he pull a bunny out of a hat?”

(Extra)Ordinary Day stages a day in the life of a magician. The show is a “mix between a magic show and a theatre show” where “every trick has its place” in the story.

Before its run at the Fundy Fringe Festival, (Extra)Ordinary Day premiered at home in Sussex. According to Stanley, the debut “didn’t go exactly as planned,” but he learned something valuable from the experience.

“I was kinda bummed about it after the show,” Stanley said. “Everyone still seemed to enjoy it. It was a big lesson in perspective.”

Undeterred, Stanley reworked the script and added a new routine to the show.

(Extra)Ordinary Day won the Fundy Fringe Festival’s Fan Favourite Award.

“It was incredibly flattering, “ Stanley said about accepting the award. “I had nothing [to say] because I didn’t expect anything, so I said thank you a bunch of times and sat back down.”

(Extra)Ordinary Day returns to Sussex on December 29th. The show will be presented at the All Seasons Inn and Restaurant (Banquet Room). Tickets are $12 or $10 with a non-perishable donation (in support of the Sussex Sharing Club).

The bar opens at 6:30pm. Show starts at 7:30pm.
Tickets can be purchased at the door or in advance at the venue.

To learn more about Sawyer Stanley: https://www.facebook.com/sawyerstanleymagic/