Meet Nora, One of Canada’s Most Creative ASMRtists

Although you may have never heard of ASMR before, it’s possible you have experienced it at some point in your life. ASMR stands for autonomous sensory meridian response, and it’s often explained as a tingling sensation caused by specific sounds and visuals. Some common ASMR triggers include page-turning, soft speaking, and tapping. One important thing to know about ASMR is triggers are not universal, meaning what may trigger ASMR for you may not do the same for someone else.

In recent years, ASMR has become an internet phenomenon. Search ‘ASMR’ on YouTube and you’ll find a lot of people, known as ASMRtists, creating ASMR videos. And it’s not just individual creators producing ASMR content, but also major businesses like IKEA and W Magazine. Since 2016, W Magazine has been inviting celebrities like Alessia Cara and Salma Hayek to experiment with ASMR on their YouTube channel. Yes, ASMR has come a long way from the small corner of YouTube it once occupied.

Even if you don’t experience ASMR, watching ASMR videos on YouTube is still really interesting. ASMRtists regularly find new creative ways to create ASMR videos. One such way is the integration of ASMR with storytelling.

Which is something that Seafoam Kitten’s ASMR does very well.

“I was a viewer myself for years,” says Nora, the Nova Scotian ASMRtist behind Seafoam Kitten’s ASMR. “I would watch it every night before bed and sometimes just during the day to chill out.”

“I’ve always been someone who is super shy and I was embarrassed by my own voice too, but by 2016 I had grown a lot more confident and I realized those ASMR people are just like me. I could totally try doing it too!”

The positive feedback Nora received on her first video made her feel “really excited” and motivated to continue making videos. Since uploading her first video in 2016, Nora’s YouTube channel has garnered almost 100 thousand subscribers and nearly 20 million total views.

“I’m so happy my viewership has grown and people actually like my content,” Nora says. “It feels so good to know that I’m helping people. It gives me something to look forward to every day and I’ve made so many amazing friends through this. I love it!”

For people unfamiliar with ASMR, Nora explains it as “a lovely feeling that induces relaxation.”

“ASMR videos can make you really sleepy and it also helps to reduce stress, anxiety, insomnia, or just get a nice tingly feeling!”

Nora’s character roleplay videos are popular with viewers. In these videos, Nora plays different characters  — which have so far included an alien, a dragon, a vampire, and even the viewer’s phone — in a variety of situations. “A big inspiration for my characters is just character tropes in anime.”

“So basically take a monster/animal/object, turn it into a girl and hurray you have a weird and interesting (and sometimes funny) character,” Nora says. “I’m also really inspired by internet culture, memes, and the horror/mystery genre.”

To help bring her characters to life, Nora spends time “[messing] around with makeup and props.”

“I just do what I think will suit the character,” Nora says. “The great thing about YouTube is that you don’t have to buy or make a full costume because it’s mostly just your shoulders and face that are shown!”

Among the things Nora has learned since she began creating ASMR videos has been managing her taxes as a full-time, self-employed ASMRtist. “It’s more complicated than when you work for a company.”

“Also since I do character roleplays and stuff, I learned SO much about video editing and filming/audio equipment, it’s always so fun to try new things,” says Nora.

And while the work that goes on behind the scenes can be “time consuming,” Nora says none of that matters when “it’s something you love to do.”

“I guess one thing about making ASMR videos,” Nora says, “is that it’s a very personal and intimate experience so it’s really common to get viewers who become a little too involved.”

“I’ve…learned that there are a LOT of troubled people out there, and they choose to express themselves in different ways. Some just watch and let it make them feel better, some message me about all their troubles like a diary, some become too emotionally attached and say gross creepy things, some express anger and resentment.”

“Most are good people though, so if you can give them some patience and kindness it will likely be worth it in the end,” Nora says. “I learned patience, understanding and keeping a cool head is one of the most important things in the world, to me at least.”

When Nora is not creating ASMR videos, she can be found making digital art for fun and taking her dog to the park.


Seafoam Kitten’s ASMR YouTube

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Interview with Rakhee Morzaria, Creator of Web Series Note to Self

Last July, Rakhee Morzaria’s debut web series Note to Self premiered on CBC Comedy. Note to Self sees Morzaria — playing a heightened version of herself — living and learning in Toronto. Learning what? How trying to tweet while walking down the sidewalk is a bad idea, sending positive vibes into the world isn’t always enough, and the importance of bike safety. Eight episodes were released on a biweekly schedule, with the last episode airing in October.

In January, Morzaria’s Note to Self received a Canadian Screen Award nomination (“Best Web Program or Series, Fiction”).

From the writing to the diversity of its cast, there’s a lot to like in Note to Self. Morzaria is hilarious as she runs into situations with full confidence, only for it to backfire on her. 

What stands out most for me about Morzaria’s web series is its fresh perspective. How often do I get to watch comedy that really gets me? Not often enough. In fact, rarely. In under three minutes, episode four of Note to Self captures one of my biggest insecurities as someone born to immigrants. That is, I’m not really Latino. Sure, I’m brown, speak the language (mostly), and like eating spicy foods, but I am and will always be seen as the Canadian boy. This line of dialogue from Morzaria, who’s upset with an Indian employee of a pizza shop for misspelling her name, made me both laugh and reflect on my own life experiences.

RAKHEE — Is it me? Is it, you saw me and you thought, oh this is just some white-washed millennial who grew up in Canada not India. She’s not really Indian. I bet she can’t even speak the language! Because I can. I know words. I know plenty of words.


Note to Self
returns with five new episodes starting Monday, June 11th. Episodes will be released every other week on CBC Comedy and Morzaria’s Facebook page.

Here, Morzaria talks about starring in her debut web series, writing inspiration, and being nominated for a CSA.

Did you know from the start you wanted to play a version of yourself? Why was it important for you to approach the project this way?

Rakhee Morzaria: I knew I would be playing a heightened version of myself because it’s written through my perspective and because so many of the episodes are based on my real-life experiences. As a comedienne, my name is my brand so it made sense to keep the character’s name as my own.

Tell me about the inspiration behind episode four.

Morzaria: This episode is based on an experience I had at a chain pizza joint. Everyone working was East Indian and they were having so much fun, speaking Gujarati, making pizzas and hanging out. Part of me thought, maybe I should apply to work here? It looked so fun! When I saw my name come up on that screen – completely misspelled – I realized that, though I felt a strong connection to them, they felt and/or saw no connection to me.  Ha – that sounds quite sad! Though I didn’t actually confront anyone (like I do in the episode), I tried to capture that feeling as best as possible while adding some comic relief.

What has the response been like to that episode? I know one of the reasons I enjoyed it was how much I could relate to the insecurity over identity and belonging. I imagine others, who are the children of immigrants, saw themselves in it, too. Have people told you that?

Morzaria: I’m sure this is true. Many people have told me they like that episode the best because they relate to it. As a first-generation Canadian I spent so much of my early life trying to fit in. Only when I got older did I feel comfortable truly embracing my culture and exploring it. I believe everyone’s experiences are different but I’ve noticed a unique commonality of “where do I fit” felt among other first-generation Canadians that I know.

Note to Self was nominated for a Canadian Screen Award earlier this year. What did that recognition mean for you?

Morzaria: I was humbled to be nominated.  I still am. When we began filming the videos I had planned on releasing them myself! I was thrilled when CBC Comedy came on board to help produce them and being recognized by the Academy of Canadian Cinema & Television was like a cherry on top.

Lastly, anything you would like to share about Note to Self returning on June 11th?

Morzaria: Creating the series has been such an incredible experience. I’m very pleased with the new episodes… there’s one in particular that’s a snapshot into my family life and culture and I’m excited to share it.  I’m so grateful to our director, cast, crew and CBC for helping bring this project into fruition. I truly hope people like the new episodes, and [if] they don’t…I truly hope they share them anyways.


Rakhee Morzaria’s Note to Self
Created / Produced / Starring: Rakhee Morzaria

To learn more about Rakhee, visit: http://www.rakheemorzaria.com/

Interview with Sharon Belle and Maddy Foley, Creators of Web Series Step Sisters

Created by Sharon Belle and Maddy Foley, Step Sisters is a non-autobiographical web series about two women who sit and talk on the front steps of their house. Sounds simple enough, right? Well, in the world of Step Sisters nothing is ever simple. Conversations spiral out of control as Belle and Foley — who play roommates — deal with getting fired, escalating lies, and dating in Toronto.

What makes Step Sisters stand out is the way Belle and Foley manage to surprise their audience with every new episode — 16 episodes to date on YouTube. It’s hilarious to see how far Belle and Foley push their characters to get out of awkward situations and misunderstandings. And everything plays out in this often frenetic, yet well-timed, unfiltered dialogue that makes the friendship feel so much more genuine.

I had the chance to chat with Belle and Foley ahead of the season finale — airing Tuesday, May 29th. Here, Belle and Foley talk about filming during winter, the inspiration behind Step Sisters, and the future of the web series.

The chemistry between you two in this series is excellent. Your dialogue is just so funny. How long had you known each other before working on Step Sisters?

Maddy: We met about a year ago on the set of Allie and Lara Make a Horror Movie and became fast friends. We had a comedic chemistry immediately and just kept making off-handed jokes and one-liners that didn’t quite make sense… sometimes even to each other.  But we would still laugh.  Basically, what you see in Step Sisters is an exaggeration of our rapport.

Sharon: The funny thing is we didn’t even see it at first. I wish teaming up was our idea, but it was other people telling us that we’re funny, or that we should write a show together that really got me thinking about it seriously.

When did filming for Step Sisters take place, and how long did you shoot? I dig the winter setting, especially those shots where we can see some snow falling (hopefully the weather cooperated!)

Maddy: Yeah! We got really lucky with the snow staying fairly consistent.  We also did everything in one take (as you see in the style of our show) which helped a lot with the continuity! We took 4 full days to shoot the entire series – it was a pretty quick turnover.  We aimed for 5 episodes a day and ended up cutting 3 for various reasons.  We had a pretty tight schedule but it was definitely manageable and still was a lot of fun and gave us the opportunity to try different bits out.

Sharon:  The winter setting was tricky at first. After writing episodes we would revisit them and constantly be asking ourselves “But WHY are they sitting outside!” Just like working with such a small budget ($500) I think the challenge definitely made the show better. It forced us to be more creative and weird. It got really unbearably cold at times, but yeah that snow was a literal gift from the heavens.

The audience doesn’t really know what to expect from episode to episode. We go from pink eye in the first episode to 2-for-1 cavity deals, pigeon murder, and a very drunk Groundhog Day. Did you know from the beginning that Step Sisters was going to be so wacky or was it something you came upon as you got further into developing the project?

Maddy: Our writing style sort of lends itself to some wacky outcomes.  We start with little bits or jokes and start bouncing stuff off each other and then try to expand it into something remotely narrative.  So the story arcs come from us extrapolating from these weird little jokes and finding ways to sew them together.  With that, things get real weird real quick because you’re trying to connect things that aren’t naturally connected.  But we found it hilarious and just hoped other people might too.

Sharon:  Yeah we honestly just kept discovering the project as it moved along. It wasn’t even until people started watching it and saying things like “It’s so weird” or “It’s completely insane” that we began to realize the monster we had created. We actually didn’t think we were making something that crazy. On paper, I promise you, the show actually looks pretty tame. All that being said, we’re really happy with how it turned out and how it’s being received.

Tell me about the inspiration behind some of the episodes. I’m eager to know what inspired the pigeon episode and the episode where your characters do extra work. Is the latter based on personal experience?

Maddy: The inspirations varied so much, again, from little off handed jokes to full scenarios or exaggerations of things that have happened to us or sometimes weird thoughts we would have or just happy accidents from our meetings.  It’s really just a jumble of things. The extra work is definitely based on real life experiences.  I think that was more of a quick joke we made that led itself to a full episode because there’s lots of material there.

Sharon: We went through the writing process together, but we did attempt to split up the work as far as episodes go. So I would say that approximately 50% are from my brain and 50% from Maddy’s. So yeah the pigeon thing, that was my brain fart. I actually did run over a pigeon one day on my bike and it was horrifying. But like…what if it wasn’t? Recently we described our characters as the Id’s to our Ego and I think that fits really well with how we spun our stories.

Are there any future plans for Step Sisters? Can we expect to see your characters sitting on steps elsewhere in Toronto?

Maddy:  We hope so! We’re going to keep working on some other projects we’ve been writing but we definitely love Step Sisters and want to keep it going. 

Sharon: If I could sit on those steps forever and make fart jokes with Maddy I would be a happy lady.